City Limits- SNAP: Trickle-down Impact

The USDA estimates that there are 45 million people in America using SNAP. City Limits Katie Zilcosky examines how proposed changes to the food nutrition program will impact local families, food security, and agriculture in our region.

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Catch Up On The Latest Reports Diagnosing Issues Related To Poverty In Syracuse.

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provided photo / Ken Sturtz/Rescue Mission

The Rescue Mission broke ground Wednesday on a new $5.8 million expansion project to remodel its food service center in Syracuse.  The much-needed upgrade has been about two years in the making.  With lines often out the door, the additional space is designed to serve more meals to people and cut down on wait times. 

Carolyn Hendrickson with the Rescue Mission is ready to help the growing need for meals and housing.

"This project in particular is near and dear to my heart.  I'm so excited to see us at this juncture and seeing the project come to fruition."

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

While President Trump is in Brussels attacking NATO members for not spending enough on defense and calling Germany "a captive" of Russia for its support of a new pipeline to deliver Russian gas, lawmakers in Washington are standing up for the 69-year-old trans-Atlantic alliance.

Governor Cuomo's flickr page

For the second day in a row, Governor Cuomo held rallies criticizing President Donald Trump’s choice for the Supreme Court, and urging action on a measure that would protect the right to choose abortion in New York.

Mandel Ngan / AFP/Getty images via NPR

President Trump’s appointee to the Supreme Court is sparking conversation among political observers here in Syracuse, as well as among the state’s elected officials. 

Professor of Political Science at the Maxwell School, Thomas Keck, says Brett Kavanaugh’s appointment means issues that had partisan debate in recent history would now be taking a consistently conservative bend. 

When President Trump signed the executive order last month that ended the separation of migrant families, he effectively swapped one controversial practice for another — in this case, the indefinite detention of whole families.

Chris Bolt/WAER News / WAER FM

The visit of Ivanka Trump to the P-Tech program at Syracuse’s I-T-C school did not go unnoticed by demonstrators who wanted to protest immigration and education policy.  Rae Kramer was there to oppose Trump Administration border actions she calls cruel and racist.  And she believes Ms. Trump could persuade her father on the issue.

President Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy was met with swift partisan response from many in Congress, emphasizing the power of a narrow group of uncommitted senators.

A large number of Senate Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., immediately announced that they plan to vote against Kavanaugh.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse’s P-tech school at the Institute of technology received a guest Monday that they hope will champion the program on a national level. 

First daughter and presidential advisor Ivanka Trump praised the school, local colleges, and business partners for their roles in preparing the local workforce.

Ms. Trump hosted a roundtable discussion to learn more about how the specialized high school curriculum connects students to local companies through mentorships and job shadowing, which could lead to future jobs. 

Of the nearly 3,000 migrant minors who were separated from their parents and placed in federal custody, the Trump administration says at least 102 are under 5 years old. And for several weeks, administration officials have been under a court-ordered deadline: Reunite those young children with their parents, and do it quickly.

Lindsay Hadlock / Cornell University

Central New Yorkers have grown all too accustomed to occasional beach closures over the summer due to unsafe levels of bacteria in the water. Cornell University and a bio-technology device maker are working on a new and much faster way to test the water and get swimmers back in the lake. 

For Ruth Richardson, this is where she says her heart meets her science.

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