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Scott Willis / WAER News

Settlement Reforms Solitary Confinement of Juveniles at Onondaga County Jail

The treatment of juveniles at the Onondaga County Justice Center is about to change after a settlement that ends the routine practice of placing 16 and 17 year-olds in solitary confinement for weeks and even months at a time. The agreement comes nine months after a lawsuit was filed on behalf of the teens. The suit was brought by Legal services of Central New York and the New York Civil Liberties Union. LSCNY staff attorney Josh Cotter says they wanted to show that jail deputies shouldn’t be...

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Invisibilia on WAER

Season 3 of Invisibilia comes to WAER starting July 7th at 7pm.

Technical Difficulties

We are having some technical issues with the HD transmitter. This will affect listening to HD2 and HD3 channels. We are working on it.

syririshfilmfest.com/

Syracuse has a deep rooted Irish heritage and a long history of celebrating it. The Contemporary Irish Film Festival gives Syracuse natives new ways to explore their Irish background. Founder and Director, Micha Crook, says parades and cultural festivals are not the only avenues to embrace their culture.

The Senate vote on a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is, according to conventional wisdom, one week away.

And we still don't know what's in the bill.

Not having concrete information is deeply uncomfortable for a journalist like me.

Defeat is an orphan.

Summing up the left's response to its deflating loss in a special congressional election in the Atlanta suburbs were two reactions:

1. Jim Dean, chairman of the progressive activist group Democracy For America, in a statement:

Russia's efforts to interfere with last year's elections will be front and center during two hearings on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson will appear before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence while the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence will hear from current U.S. intelligence officials and state election experts.

Here are five questions likely to be on lawmakers' minds as they listen to witnesses and ask questions.

Bridget McAllister / WAER News

It’s been five years since the creation of the Greater Syracuse Land Bank, and Tuesday, officials hosted a bus tour showcasing examples of its efforts to revitalize blighted properties and neighborhoods.  Executive director Katelyn Wright says they can’t do it alone; private investors are the key to their success.

John Smith/WAER News

Lakeview Amphitheater Concertgoers in Syracuse will notice some improvements this year and more is on the way.  All of the internal walkways and a centrally located A.D.A. parking lot with 125 spaces have been paved to allow for a better experience for those who have mobility issues.  Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney says a select number of boaters will be able to arrive to the shows and dock.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse-area Congressmember John Katko is trying once again to push through legislation aimed at plugging the pipeline of synthetic drugs.  The bi-partisan, bi-cameral legislation is the latest attempt to tackle the epidemic that continues to sweep the region and the nation.

The U.S. Census Bureau has never asked Americans about sexual orientation and gender identity. Last year, though, requests for that data came from more than 75 members of Congress and multiple federal agencies.

Still, the Census Bureau concluded "there was no federal data need" to collect this information, the bureau's outgoing director, John Thompson, wrote in March.

Scott Willis / WAER News

The Syracuse Parks Department is marking a century of operation this year, and WAER News has spent the past few weeks profiling some of the city’s most unique green spaces.  In this final installment, Scott Willis visits perhaps one of the largest hidden gems on the city’s southwestern edge…Elmwood Park. 

Former common councilor Bob Dougherty’s first memories of the 65-acre park go back to playing little league in the 1960’s…

On Friday, six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS resigned. In an op-ed published in Newsweek, council member Scott Schoettes wrote he and other members could no longer be effective serving a “president who simply does not care.”

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