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Chris Bolt, WAER News

Sudanese Call on US Senators and Syracuse Community to Keep Sanctions on al-Bashir Regime

Members of Syracuse’s Sudanese community are urging Congress to not ease sanctions against Sudan’s violent leader. Today's announcement was part of a nationwide day of action to support Sudanese people. Abraham Dut Deng was one of the first Lost Boys of Sudan to come to New York. He ended up in Syracuse along with other refugees fleeing deadly violence. His message aimed at Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Congress Member John Katko is to keep pressure and sanctions on the government of Omar al...

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Community Events

City Limits: A Poverty Project

Catch Up On The Latest Reports Diagnosing Issues Related To Poverty In Syracuse.

Upstate University Hospital Launches Program to Help Visitors Quit Smoking

Apr 12, 2018
provided photo / SUNY Upstate

Upstate University Hospital will be offering nicotine replacement therapy to visitors to help curb their smoking habits starting next Friday. The hospital prohibits smoking within 100 feet of its buildings.

Director of Employee Student Health at Upstate Jarrod Bagatell says they used to give people information about how to quit smoking, but one encounter changed that.

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A reporter with the New Yorker Magazine will bring a behind the scenes look at North Korea’s government to Syracuse on Monday as part of the Rosamond Gifford Lecture Series.  Evan Osnos traveled to Pyongyang in August of 2017 to interview government officials about their perceptions of the US. He describes the city as a staged set that has been prepared for foreign consumption.

Cornell Law School website.

A Cornell University Immigration Law School Professor is drawing attention to a more than 200 page leaked draft of a federal proposal.  Under the plan, he says housing assistance and energy benefits would longer be accessible to immigrants.  In his 35 years of teaching and practicing immigration law, Steven Yale-Loehr, calls the proposal – “a sledgehammer on the system.”

Through one avenue or another we are all probably familiar with The Nobel Prize. But how much do we actually know about the history of the award? This week on Science on the Radio Dr. Marvin Druger gets us up to speed on the award that dates back to 1895.

Who is eligible to win the Nobel Prize? What does one actually win when they are  awarded the prize? Find the answers to these questions and more on this weeks episode of Science On The Radio.

If you like what you hear don't forget to subscribe in Apple Podcasts for automatic delivery of new episodes.

drugabuse.gov

Democratic candidate for governor Cynthia Nixon outlined her plans for legalizing marijuana in New York in a video, saying the state lags far behind some other states. Governor Cuomo says he’s studying the issue.

Nixon, who is challenging Cuomo in a Democratic primary, says New York should follow the lead of eight other states and end a “key front” in what she says is the  “racist” war on drugs.

An epic throw-down happened Thursday on Capitol Hill over the role of the federal government. The topic: the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency created in the wake of the 2007-08 financial crisis.

On one side was the Trump administration's acting director, Mick Mulvaney, who believes the bureau's powers are excessive and unchecked. On the other was Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who led the creation of the bureau to protect consumers from abuses by everything from big banks to student loan providers to fly-by-night loan sharks.

What would happen if an unfriendly nation tried to take down the power grid, or the air traffic control system, or blow up a chemical plant with a cyberattack?

How would government agencies respond to such a threat?

That kind of war-gaming has been playing out this week in a windowless conference room at the Secret Service headquarters in Washington, D.C., in an exercise officials call "Cyber Storm VI."

provided photo

More student tenants have come forward with complaints about unsafe and unsanitary conditions at properties owned by a University-area landlord. The students are the latest to join a tenant association that formed in February demanding that Syracuse Quality Living promptly and properly address maintenance complaints. SU graduate student Emily Kraft says nothing appeared wrong until she moved in.

Among the many questions Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrestled with as he testified before Congress Tuesday and Wednesday was one of a more existential nature: What, exactly, is Facebook?

Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska) asked Zuckerberg whether the social networking website was a tech company or a publisher.

Zuckerberg replied, "When people ask us if we're a media company — or a publisher — my understanding of what the heart of what they're really getting at is, 'Do we feel responsibility for the content on our platform?' The answer to that, I think, is clearly yes."

Some Syracuse Corner Stores are now Offering Healthy Options for Customers

Apr 11, 2018
Leo Tully / WAER News

The co-owner of a well-established corner store in Syracuse’s Hawley Green Neighborhood says she realized the need to provide better nutritional options for customers, especially impressionable young kids.

"I could see the kids when they were young and they have grown up and I'm like, look at all these kids getting bigger and bigger every day and it brings tears to my eyes. I said, these are beautiful children, they just need someone to guide them to eat healthy."

 

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