Chris Bolt/WAER News

  About 30 people could be seen pedaling their bicycles around Onondaga County this weekend enjoying nature...but also learning about how green infrastructure is saving it.  The Save the Rain program was showing off some of the things the county is doing in its Downtown Bike Tour.

Onondaga Citizens League Report Warns of Underinvestment in Young Children

Apr 14, 2014
WAER News

The Onondaga Citizens League released a report calling attention to a serious lack of investment in the community’s youngest children. The report, entitled “Thrive by Five,” acknowledges the fact that New York State is making provisions to improve kindergarten and Pre-K but warns that officials have failed to place enough emphasis on the earliest developmental stages.

Scott Willis / WAER News

It’s probably happened to some of us – we’re focused on checking email or texting on the go that we might not be aware of our surroundings.  Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said smartphone robberies are becoming more of a problem because it can mean easy money. 

“People who are on their smartphones often are distracted,” he said, “you know, if they’re listening to music or something. People just knock them over, grab [the cell phone], and it’s too easy.”  

A rise in smartphone robberies is why Schneiderman and the San Francisco District Attorney began the “Secure Our Smartphones Coalition.” Unlike other cities, Syracuse is lucky and has yet to report any fatality due to cell phone robberies. However, Frank Fowler, Syracuse Police Chief, said phone thefts have risen in the past year. According to Fowler, they account for more than 1/3 of all robberies.

Robberies of any type of property places people in harm’s way. When we can discourage this type of robbery, we can have an opportunity to decrease our robberies by 35%, and that’s a great number.”    The "kill switches" would make the phones less appealing to thieves.  But Schneiderman says  there's also little incentive for manufacturers and even the service providers, who are not cooperating. 

Chris Bolt/WAER News

Syracuse University officially welcomed its 12th chancellor with an inauguration ceremony Friday.  Kent Syverud has already given a number of hints at the direction he plans taking in the job.

John Smith/WAER News

Massive tents on the quad, painters in the main entrance of Hendrick’s Chapel and a walk-through balloon bouquet were all indications Thursday that something of significance will be happening soon at Syracuse University. A full day of events will coincide Friday with the inauguration of a new chancellor.  As part of the celebrations, Kent Syverud wanted to involve students by encouraging them to submit ideas for projects they would like to launch to improve the campus and local community.  Allie Curtis is one of the contestants.

GreekPeak.net

  Summer season might not be the time you think about heading to a ski resort. Greek Peak owners John Meier and Marc Stemerman have been skiing on the mountain for the past thirty years. But it wasn’t until last summer that they took time to enjoy the off season.

Annie Russell is VPR's weekend producer. She has interned for NPR at Weekends on All Things Considered and for WNYC at On The Media.  She is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School. She loves the Boston Celtics unconditionally.

syrgov.net

The Chair of the Syracuse Common Council's Finance Committee is concerned the Mayor may be relying too much on the city's reserves in her budget proposal. Councilor Kathleen Joy and her colleagues began budget hearings Wednesday to go over the $660 million spending plan line by line.  Joy says using 20 million dollars in rainy day funds doesn't seem to address past warnings from the Mayor herself.

On April 25th at 6:30 p.m., WAER will present the annual Jazz and Wine fundraiser in partnership with the Community Folk Art Center. This year's event will feature the talented bassist and vocalist, Mimi Jones. Jones played in Syracuse last year as part of Tia Fuller's ensemble at WAER's Jazz Appreciation Month concert last year. This time around, Jones is showcasing her unique individual talents as a performer and composer.

 

Alan Greenblatt has been covering politics and government in Washington and around the country for 20 years. He came to NPR as a digital reporter in 2010, writing about a wide range of topics, including elections, housing economics, natural disasters and same-sex marriage.

He was previously a reporter with Governing, a magazine that covers state and local government issues. Alan wrote about education, budgets, economic development and legislative behavior, among other topics. He is the coauthor, with Kevin Smith, of Governing States and Localities, a college-level textbook that is now in its fourth edition.

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