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Space
3:22 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A Year On Mars: What's Curiosity Been Up To?

This self-portrait of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity combines dozens of exposures taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager during the 177th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars, plus three exposures taken during Sol 270 to update the appearance of part of the ground beside the rover.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:55 am

Imagine winning the World Series, the lottery and a Nobel Prize all in one day. That's pretty much how scientists and engineers in mission control at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., felt one year ago when the 1 ton, six-wheeled rover named Curiosity landed safely on Mars.

Within minutes, the rover began sending pictures back to Earth. In the past year it has sent back a mountain of data and pictures that scientists are sorting through, trying to get a better understanding of the early climate on Mars.

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The Two-Way
2:56 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Calif. Gov. Brown Intervenes, BART Strike Averted For Now

A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train sits in the Rockridge station on Friday in Oakland, Calif. San Francisco Bay Area commuters were bracing for the possibility of a BART strike as a 30-day contract extension was set to expire Sunday at midnight.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:35 am

Commuters can rest a little easier — another threatened strike at the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit system has been avoided, at least temporarily.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has appointed a board of investigators to look into the contract dispute that had threatened to shut down the system.

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Education
6:38 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Missed Summer Learning Spells Out Long-Term Struggles

A researcher at Johns Hopkins University says there are serious setbacks for children without summer educational opportunities, known as the "summer slide."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 7:52 pm

At first glance, Horizons looks like an ordinary summer getaway for kids: There are games, bonding time and lots of bagged snacks. But along with the songs and the pool, there are fractions to memorize and online grammar quizzes to take.

An affiliate of a national network, the program in Washington, D.C., is a six-week, free summer service for children from low-income families. Its purpose is simple: to make sure they don't fall behind in school by the time September rolls around.

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Law
5:06 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

U.S. Teen Is Youngest Ever To Pass Britain's Bar Exams

At 18, Gabrielle Turnquest is the youngest person in the history of the English legal system to be admitted to the bar.
Neil Hall Courtesy The University of Law

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:38 pm

At 18 years old, Gabrielle Turnquest has become the youngest person to pass Britain's bar exams.

The Florida native told NPR's Jackie Lyden her family influenced her decision to study law in the United Kingdom. Her mother had studied in the U.K. and she joined an older sister who was also studying law.

She graduated from college early, too — at 16, she was the youngest person to ever get a psychology degree from Liberty University in Virginia.

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Remembrances
5:06 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

In His Own Words: Remembering Poet Robert Hayden

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:38 pm

Robert Hayden was born in Detroit 100 years ago Sunday. He became the first African-American to receive the honor now known as "poet laureate." Among his most famous works is the collection of short poems called Elegies for Paradise Valley. We hear an excerpt from the collection, as read by the author in 1976.

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