Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways To Connect

waer news

  Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner proposes a city budget that holds the line on taxes, sewer and water fees.  Miner says in a release she’s keeping the city a good place to live.

 “From continued investments in programs like Say Yes to Education, we are demonstrating we are willing to make big ideas work for the people of our community. Additionally, by not raising taxes, water rates, and sewer rates, we are keeping Syracuse an affordable City where people can live, work, and raise a family.”

Valerie Hoover

  Central New Yorkers might be worried about flooding over the next few days…with rain in today’s forecast coupled with the recent snowmelt.  One expert in flood repair has a very personal connection to a hidden threat of water damage.

wikipedia

  The Village of Fayetteville’s Mayor says residents could possibly see the former site of O’Brien and Gere start to get a face-lift six months from now.  However, a series of approvals needs to happen, first for a large apartment and mixed-use development project.  

A meeting will be held Monday night for the Village Planning Board to look further at the specifics of the project.  It calls for 12, three-story buildings with 26 apartment units in each.  Mayor Mark Olson says the developer is required to get a zone change for the mixed- use development.

nih.gov

  Central New Yorkers who take supplements to improve their health might be wondering who to believe and what to take, after major retailers were targeted by state officials for possible fraud.  A Skaneateles-based dietician offers some advice amid the confusion.

Centerstate Corporation for Economic Opportunity

Central New York businesses that are growing, investing, and helping the community were recognized today at Centerstate CEO’s Business of the year luncheon.  WAER’s Chris Bolt reports the focus was on opportunity.

Minority Economic Alliance president Edward Cuello

Anjali Alwis/WAER News

  April is a month in which some local organizations are doing their best to prevent some of the worst crimes from scarring the lives of Central New York’s Children.  If you look around the community, one simple symbol might help.

Chris Bolt, WAER News

During a talk at Syracuse University, U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter explained on Tuesday how he plans to adapt the mission and the make-up of the military to a changing world.

Chris Bolt

A number of Central New York employers provide incentives, programs and facilities so their employees can be healthier. 

Eight were recognized by the American Heart Association with their Platinum-level Award for being a “Fit-Friendly Worksite.”

Annie Griffiths / The Ripple Effect

  A National Geographic Photographer who’s focused her camera on the plight of poor women across the world speaks at Syracuse University Tuesday night as part of the University Lectures series. Her photographs developed into a project that's helped others called The Ripple Effect.  

xploitme / flickr.com

  The popularity of superheroes has reached the masses with movies and more television adaptations but what about the root of it all, the comic book? What makes it still appealing 75 years later? Professor of Television and Pop Culture at Syracuse University, Bob Thompson, believes it was comic book’s imagination that made the Golden Age so unique.

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