Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways to Connect

As people think about holiday giving…they might want to think about the legacy they can leave long-term.  Central New York’s Baby Boomers will be leaving behind billions of dollars over the next couple decades, according to a study of local personal worth.  WAER’s Chris Bolt reports even a small percentage of that wealth could make a big difference in the community. 

(Anchor Lead):

Community leaders and politicians can’t seem to find many answers for the epidemic of heroin and other drug abuse.  The issue is certainly on Washington’s Radar.  We examine how congress might act, in this second part of our congressional election series. 
WAER’s Chris Bolt compares the tragic stories of families torn up by heroin…with proposals by 24th district congressional candidates.  

cnyhistory.org

Most people have heard of or seen the Jerry Rescue Story and Monument.  You might also know the Mission Restaurant downtown gave safe harbor to escaped slaves, as did other local homes.  In the last part of C-N-Y Unknown Underground, we’ll fill in some interesting details; each historic connection might have had more significance than you know.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

One Central New York man has his name woven through much of the history of the abolitionist movement…though many might not know him, or much about him.  In this installment of our Black History Month series C-N-Y: Unknown Underground we’ll visit Peterboro to learn a little more about Gerrit Smith.  Many of the anti-slavery activities and prominent figures in local history benefited greatly from his support. 

Anjali Alwis/WAER News

no one chooses refugee camps
or strip searches where your
body is left aching
or prison,
because prison is safer
than a city of fire
and one prison guard
in the night
is better than a truckload
of men who look like your father
no one could take it
no one could stomach it
no one skin would be tough enough

  

Nasreen was so excited that her journey was finally over! She remembers thinking it was the end of their troubles – they would soon be in Germany and reunited with her husband.

(provided photo)

A little music in the afternoon at M-and-T bank in downtown Syracuse had to mean only one thing.

The line-up and dates of the M-and-T Syracuse Jazzfest were announced Wednesday.  The 35th edition of the popular jazz concert will feature Jazz icon Ramsey Lewis and his electric quintet on Friday. June 9th.  They’ll be followed by the high-energy group The Mavericks.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

Many people have walked or driven right past one of the most prolific passageways of the Underground Railroad in Syracuse…and never even knew it.  Why is an unassuming street corner in Syracuse really an important weigh station of history?

You very well might have driven past the intersection of East Genesee Street and Pine…maybe thousands of times.  Writer and local resident Madis Senner had a friend that lived just a few doors down.  

The opioid and heroin epidemic is still as problematic as ever in Central New York as treatment options continue to expand.  That’s according to the Director of Behavioral Health at Crouse Hospital in Syracuse.  Last year, 325 patients were admitted to the medication assistive treatment program and the current census has 700 patients enrolled for treatment services which can span several years or decades.  Behavioral Health Director Monika Taylor is anticipating funding from the State Budget and at the Federal level.

Anjali Alwis/WAER News

you have to understand,
that no one puts their children in a boat
unless the water is safer than the land
no one burns their palms
under trains
beneath carriages
no one spends days and nights in the stomach of a truck
feeding on newspaper unless the miles traveled
means something more than journey.
no one crawls under fences
no one wants to be beaten
pitied

Maria Welych/MOST.org

Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci is famous for his paintings of the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper.  But what many might overlook is he was an inventor ahead of his time. The Museum of Science and Technology in Armory Square opened a permanent exhibit over the weekend on National Inventors Day displaying da Vinci’s engineering drawings and models. Senior Director Kevin Lucas says the exhibit was recently on tour and it has found its permanent ho­me at the MOST.

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