Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways to Connect

Chris Bolt / WAER News

  Hundreds of millions of dollars are needed the truly fix up the roads, water systems and other infrastructure problems in Syracuse.  Mayor Miner and others renewed that call to New York State on Thursday by visiting Oak Street, where a 6 foot wide section of the road hole caved in earlier in week.  The cave in was just one the latest examples of how the aging backbone of the city is in need of immediate attention.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  The Sheriff department has purchased new devices that could save more lives in Onondaga County and save tax payer money. Sheriff Eugene Conway announced that 95 Automated External Defibrillators would enhance public safety. Conway says when he served as Police Chief in Dewitt, he witnessed occasions when people were rescued from fatal circumstances.

  Public schools across New York State are getting ready to add something new to their health curriculum.  Starting this October, hands-only CPR training will become a graduation requirement for all high school students.  This is part of the new CPR for Schools law, which was approved yesterday by the New York State Board of Regents.

John Smith / WAER News

Better parking, flights to more cities, and a facelift for the front of Hancock International Airport highlight the transportation hub's future goals.  The Syracuse Regional Airport Authority issued its annual report Friday.  

  Executive Director Christina Callahan looked back on improved concessions, featuring local beers and food products, and improving the parking garage.  Travelers will also be able to sign up for TSA pre-check starting in October.  Now Callahan is ready to make a few other visible upgrades.

  A Syracuse financial advisor is offering investors some perspective on the impact China’s economy had on investments, portfolios and retirement accounts.  China is the world’s second largest economy...and when the dragon roars, investors here in Central New York can  fear the consequences.  

Chris Bolt/WAER News

An impromptu art exhibit on Syracuse’s North Salina Street tells a lot more about the artists than it does about any of the paintings, sculptures, poems or other works.  The art works at Syracuse Behavioral Health’s 2015 Recovery Arts Festival give insight into the journey and struggle of recovery.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  A former orphanage in Syracuse has been turned into a place that’s trying to improve learning - and the future - for some of Syracuse’s less fortunate children.  The Determination Center got some attention from the area’s Congressional representative Wednesday that just might help.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  One of the people through the turnstiles at the State Fair Tuesday was Governor Cuomo.  He was ready to share with fairgoers his vision for a new look to the fairgrounds.  The visit was making good on a promise to move the attraction into the future.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  The Legionnaire’s Disease outbreak that hit New York City earlier this summer is now having an impact here in Onondaga County.  There’s not any disease showing up, but building owners that have cooling towers are now covered by new regulationsCounty Health Department Director of Environmental Health Lisa Letteney (LETT-nee) expects the new registry to be pretty widespread.

  New Yorkers with H-I-V or AIDS that risk becoming homeless might be able to get legal help from organizations around the state. In New York, over 100-thousand people with H-I-V were living in poverty-stricken environments at the end of 2013. New York State is making a $2.5-million effort to grant legal services to individuals and families affected by H-I-V/AIDS.