Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways to Connect

http://www.donorrecovery.org/

Difficulty enrolling as an organ donor might be keeping many in Central New York and across the State from making that lifesaving decision.  New York’s 26 percent registration rate is second lowest in the country. Nancy Ryan of the Finger Lakes Donor Recovery Network says the state has to give potential donors more options to register.

Chris Bolt

Visitors to the Erie Canal Museum starting this week can enjoy an elaborate new exhibit that turns the main-floor visitors’ center into a fun and interactive journey through history.

 

The museum celebrated the completion of the museum’s new permanent first-floor exhibit, “The Erie Canal Made New York” after more than ten years of preparation, design and construction.

 

Local elections are riding the tide of the presidential race and expecting increased voter turnout. But it’s not a surprise for Onondaga County election officials like Democratic Commissioner of Elections Dustin Czarny.

“Turnout for a presidential election in Onondaga County will run anywhere between 75 and 80-percent, whereas a local election like last year, turnout was around 25 to 30-percent. So, we’re talking about double, triple the amount of votes that are being cast and those do translate down-ballot as well.”

John Smith/WAER News

If the cooler nights don’t already have Central New Yorkers thinking ahead about cold weather, National Grid released its pricing forecast for the Winter Heating Season today in Liverpool.  An average homeowner’s natural gas bills for heating should be around $455.00.  Regional Executive Melanie Littlejohn says that’s about $12.00 cheaper than a typical winter season.

socialsecurityworks.org

Lots of national and international issues are competing for time and attention this election campaign season for presidential candidates as well as our Syracuse-area congressional hopefuls.  Concerns about terrorism, international trade and immigration grab headlines…but few issues affect as many people as social security.  

Chris Bolt/WAER News

Hundreds of people in the community turned out Friday to raise thousands of dollars to help fight hunger in the annual Empty Bowls fundraiser.  People lay down 20 dollars, get a hand-made ceramic bowl and a hot-soup lunch, while supporting the cause.  

Local ceramicists and potters, some of them students and others community artists, donated their time over months to hand craft some 1500 bowls for the event.

Kasem Cares about Elder Abuse Prevention

Sep 30, 2016

The daughter of radio personality Casey Kasem experienced first-hand the effects of elder abuse…as her aging father was dealing with dementia.  Kerri Kasem shared her struggles at the today’s Elder Abuse conference.

“What I was seeing was three years ago was his wife, my stepmother, was saying you’re never going to see your dad again. It was the hardest thing that my family had to go through was being blocked from my father, a man was saw every weekend, talked to everyday on the phone.”

Human Rights Film Festival

The films featured in this year’s Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival are aimed at giving the audience a sense of “place.”  The festival begins today with “The Man Who Saw Too Much,” about the career of a photographer in Mexico whose job it was to capture death and violence in Mexico City. Director Trisha Ziff says Enrique Metinides was the eyes of a community.

Dan Hartman/Redcross.org

Volunteers and staff from the Central New York chapter of the American Red Cross and Contact Community Services hit the ground Wednesday to prevent suicide.

McMahonRyan.org

Over 200 law enforcement agents, medical professionals, therapists, and educators gathered at the Oncenter to learn about ways to protect children from physical and sexual abuse.  The Stand Against Child Abuse Conference took place Tuesday in Syracuse.

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