Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways To Connect

Chris Bolt/WAER news

Thousands of cars, from hot rods to classics to muscle cars will be on display at the New York State Fairgrounds Friday through Sunday for the 2015 Syracuse Nationals.  Organizers expect 8000 cars and as many as 80,000 visitors.  

Tourism officials told the Business Journal that last year's event boosted the local economy by $13 million.  Organizers call the Nationals the largest car show in the Northeast. 

Advocates for highway and auto safety

  A change in federal law could mean trucks with double trailers, more than 80 feet in overall length will be driving on upstate New York roads and highways.  Senator Chuck Schumer says that would mean a dangerous change in traffic that puts people at risk.  On average 4000 people a year are dying from truck related crashes and Schumer worries that would only get worse. 

solarizecny.org

  New York State has seen a boom in solar power over the past three years…and one local expert says it’s just a start of a conversion to sustainable energy sources.  

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  A ribbon cutting at a small restaurant near downtown Syracuse took place Tuesday. The simple business event might also have some cultural and neighborhood resonance.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  Builders and Homeowners could get tax incentives to make homes and apartments more accessible to people with mobility issues.  The so-called “Visit-ability” measure passed both houses of the legislature…and awaits the governor’s signature.  

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  People in downtown Syracuse will be covered by the watchful eye of crime cameras in more places from this point forward.  The Downtown Committee had a little different reason to seek out the high-tech crime fighting tools.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

The history of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad is an important story in Central New York and really throughout the state.  A unique project “Harriet Was Here” brought elementary students together with musicians and historians found a unique way to teach those lessons. 

citizenscampaign.org

  People standing on either side of the debate on Hydrofracking are speaking out about the State D-E-C’s final report that bans the natural gas drilling practice in New York. 

ongov.net

  An investigation of how two convicts broke out of a maximum security Prison in Northern New York is causing authorities to ask: what can be learned from the case? The prison break wasn’t anywhere near Onondaga County, but Sheriff Gene Conway says it’s common sense to review policies.

“You look at your own operation and you take that as an opportunity to either reassess or reevaluate or do an overall assessment of what are security features are.  I’m quite confident most every sheriff in New York State has done that or is doing that or is talking about it.”   

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  People who make a prank call to the police department could face more serious punishment. Cases such as the fake bomb threat last week at the John Mulroy Civic Center would be regarded as a new federal crime.

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