Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways To Connect

  Deaths from Cervical Cancer have dropped dramatically in the last two decades due to regular screenings becoming more routine.  WAER continues our series on cancer screening and prevention today.  Some new developments are not changing the advice of medical experts – yet.

Jessica Eley/WAER News

Thunder, lightning and drenching rains might have made a bigger bang to open the New York State Fair then Andrew Cuomo did.  But the governor did eventually cut the ribbon to start this year’s event.  The state invested pretty heavily into the fairgrounds themselves while the property has an interim director.  Cuomo might not rush to name a new head.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

Syracuse High School athletes are having talks about violence when they are not on the playing field.

The Syracuse School District is working with the local non-profit Vera House on “Coaching Boys into Men”.

It’s a violence prevention program that allows high school coaches to speak with male athletes about things like abusive language, the meaning of consent and accountability.

Nottingham high school football starting center Joseph Bell says he thinks the program will be a great opportunity.

SaltCityCritiqu

  People trying to find a parking place in Syracuse can go high tech and use a new mobile phone app.  The service called Whoosh will also let you pay for that parking right from your phone.  Mayor Stephanie Miner announced the service today – and it’s already up and running.  Drivers can just open the app on their phones right after they’ve parked the car.

  Patients in New York hospitals and doctors' offices are seeing more nurses conducting more of the direct care.  A coalition of members of the profession is trying to improve both the training nurses undertake and the practice of their skills.  Registered Nurse Julie Carter is part of the 'Future of Nursing Action Coalition' working on improved, ongoing education.

Hannah Warren/WAER News

  Just down the road from our studio is a historic sculpture garden that used to be a hangout for the city’s elite. It just may not be the kind of public park you’d normally imagine.

In the early eighteen hundreds, Oakwood Cemetery – which is now just off Comstock Avenue – was where the wealthy gathered for leisure time and picnics.

npr.org

  A Syracuse University Free Speech expert finds a couple examples of how constitutional rights might have been trampled during the protests in Ferguson, MissouriRoy Gutterman is Director of the Tully Center for Free Speech at S-U’s Newhouse School of Communications.  He calls police suppression of citizens scary, like a military crackdown.  Gutterman admi

  Several types of deadly cancer can be stopped or treated if found early enough.  But many Central New Yorkers avoid the screenings even though they’re more convenient and available than ever.  WAER’s Chris Bolt starts a series on the latest in detecting certain cancers.  Today: Why people don’t let modern medicine help.

There’s plenty of public education efforts out there to try and convince people to get screened for any number of cancers.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  The republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor joined State Comptroller Candidate Bob Antonacci today in Syracuse to announce a way to get more votes in November – possibly from people who aren’t republicans.  They filed 62,000 petition signatures to create the “Stop Common Core” party and ballot line.  Antonacci has heard plenty of opposition to the school-standards policy while campaigning.

  Parents here in C-N-Y are probably thinking about getting things ready for their kids to go back to school.  Onondaga County Health Officials don’t want you to forget vaccines.  

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