Chris Bolt

News Director

Maybe I was destined for a career in radio when I built my first stereo receiver from a Heathkit box…then later spent time running wires over beer-stained floors for local bands in Colorado bars.  I remember becoming enamored with Public Radio's story-telling style covering an exiled music group that had come to Syracuse from El Salvador.  The piece involved interviewing through an interpreter and mixing in the music with a strongly-political story of death squads.  Over the next 23 years I’ve enjoyed covering the issues, people, events, challenges and accomplishments of Central New York. 

I came to Syracuse to finish a Broadcast Journalism degree at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School.  I’ve worked at WAER since 1990 and truly enjoy our mission of educating and engaging the community, while training aspiring journalists and broadcasters.  I’m passionate about the area’s lifestyle and efforts to improve its vitality.   When not on a story, in a studio or editing and mentoring students, I can probably be found outside.  I love Central New York’s natural areas and waterways, as well as golfing and biking opportunities.  

Ways To Connect

xploitme / flickr.com

  The popularity of superheroes has reached the masses with movies and more television adaptations but what about the root of it all, the comic book? What makes it still appealing 75 years later? Professor of Television and Pop Culture at Syracuse University, Bob Thompson, believes it was comic book’s imagination that made the Golden Age so unique.

nlm.nih.gov

A coalition of agencies trying to curb drug abuse focuses tonight on prescription drugs…and the connection they can have to heroin use.  The Youth Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition screens the documentary The Hungry Heart about a rural Vermont doctor treating a number of people addicted to prescription pain and other medications.  

  Rachel Tarr runs prevention programs at Contact Community Services.  She hopes the story can lead to some action locally.

@WAERSports

Daryl Gross is out as Syracuse University's athletic director, an email from Chancellor Kent Syverud confirmed on Tuesday.  The statement also puts Men's Basketball Coach Jim Boehiem's retirement at "within 3 years."  

http://www.familyplanningadvocates.org/

  Members of the New York State Assembly today take up a sex-trafficking bill that indicates a change in strategy on legislation aimed at supporting women.  The possible future for what was once known as the “Women’s Equality Agenda” might see the package of proposals broken apart.

File Photo

blogkqed.org

  A New York mother of a child who suffers daily seizures helped Senator Kirsten Gillibrand introduce a bill to make it easier to get medical marijuana.  

“This is clearly a case of ideology getting in the way of scientific progress. The government should not prevent doctors from prescribing medicine that has shown to work.”

City of Syracuse-Office of the Mayor

  Workers and residents in Downtown Syracuse might have walked by Perseverance Park many times, but not really known its purpose.  An effort is underway to transform the space in order to attract some attention and people.

@WAERSports

  Syracuse University suffered sanctions that could cripple basketball recruiting and competitiveness for years, after the NCAA announced the result of a years-long investigation today.  The top sanctions include the loss of three scholarships for four years in the Men's Basketball Program.  Coach Jim Boeheim will also be suspended nine games next season.

MORE DETAILS THIS AFTERNOON DURING ALL THINGS CONSIDERED AND ON WAER.ORG

ongov.net

  Onondaga County's top Politician gave a pretty positive review as regards budget matters, progress and taxpayers.  The State of the County address also gave Joanie Mahoney a chance to review her impacts and legacy as she enters an election year.

Mahoney gave a number of reasons why over her tenure in office property tax levies have been reduced by some 22 %.  She credits belt tightening, increased sales tax revenues due to some wise investments and activities, as well as reduced mandates such as Medicare. 

Lauren Winfrey/WAER News

  On a typical Syracuse Saturday Sydney Hutchinson-Mengel and her two-year-old son browse the children’s section of the local Barnes and Noble. Often just trying to keep his young mind stimulated, Hutchinson-Mengel makes it a point to visit the bookstore weekly. This Saturday, the voice of a narrator reading aloud was unexpected, but intriguing.

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