Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

A pair of explosions at a restaurant in the state of Madhya Pradesh, that have apparently been traced to gas cylinders, killed more than 60 people, officials say. Some reports say the death toll is at least 89. Dozens of others were injured.

NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you four items.

From NPR Washington Desk correspondent Brian Naylor:

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake — who battled criticism over her handling of riots earlier this year in the wake of the death in police custody of Freddie Gray — said Friday that she will not seek re-election in 2016.

Democrat Rawlings-Blake, 45, made the announcement during a morning news conference, citing her desire to concentrate on rebuilding efforts in the city in the wake of the April riots.

Two Tea Party Republican lawmakers in Michigan are gone today — one resigned, another expelled — after their alleged extramarital affair and a botched cover-up became national news last month.

Michigan state Rep. Todd Courser announced his resignation at 3:12 a.m. today after hours of debate in the state Legislature over whether to force him out of the body.

A hand-picked council that spent months writing a new constitution for Thailand has rejected its own final draft, which would have allowed the government extraordinary emergency powers. But the move ensures more months of delay that will keep in power the military junta that seized power in a coup last year.

The French secret service frogman responsible for sinking the Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior in a New Zealand harbor three decades ago has broken his long silence and apologized for the attack that killed a Portuguese photographer working for the environmental activist group.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Thousands of refugees fleeing conflict and economic privation in the Middle East, North Africa and Asia are making their way through Austria to Germany, where they hope to apply for asylum after European nations decided, reluctantly, to open their doors.

As the BBC reports:

"Several trains arrived at Munich station in the early hours of Sunday morning, many migrants travelling on to other German cities for processing.

Authorities in Thailand now say that neither of the two people in custody in connection with last month's deadly bombing of a religious shrine in the capital is the main suspect in the attack.

Investigators in Pullman, Washington, have determined that a fire at a Planned Parenthood clinic in the city was intentionally set.

The three-year-old clinic, the scene of a major anti-abortion demonstration last month, is considered structurally unsafe following the blaze that occurred around 3:30 a.m. Friday.

No one was hurt.

The Spokesman-Review reports: