Scott Willis

Host, Reporter, Producer

I’ve always been enamored with the intimacy of radio.  It’s so personal.  It forces you to listen…and listen only.  No visual distractions.  I grew up listening to mostly top 40 radio in Detroit, with no shortage of entertaining DJ’s.  As a teenager, I discovered the area’s all news station.  I loved knowing what was going on, and the intensity with which they told stories.  I often wondered what it would be like to be the first to know what was happening, and then tell others.  Maybe that’s why I pursued a career in news. 

I would go on to serve as an intern at that all-news station, and it was amazing and maybe a little overwhelming to see what it took to put out a constant stream of news.  But something was missing.  It wasn’t until after I graduated from college that I actually discovered Detroit’s public radio station at my alma mater.  What a difference!  You had time to write and tell engaging, meaningful stories, to be creative, all without the pressure to constantly crank out the news.  Quality over quantity.  That’s when I knew public radio was for me.  I was hooked.

I would hone my skills on and off for almost three years at WDET as an intern under the tutelage of a patient Assistant News Director. I produced daily stories for newscasts, but also was given the privilege of producing long-form features on topics that interested me, and that people knew very little about.  Now THAT was cool.  Right up my alley.  What budding reporter could ask for more?

I landed here in Syracuse in June 2001.  Today, I’ve come full circle, and now teach the craft to more than a dozen student reporters per week.  We work hard to choose informative stories, find the most engaging sound, and edit copy for clarity and accuracy. 

Outside of work, I spend time with my wife and little boy.  We like to take walks, travel, and read.  When I can, I’ll hop on my bike for a quick ride.

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the honor and privilege of bringing WAER’s dedicated and generous listeners the news of the day during All Things Considered.  Thanks for listening.

Ways To Connect

Maria Catanzarite/WAER News

President Obama continued his bus tour of Upstate New York today after spending the night in Auburn.  He spent the morning working out at the YMCA and shooting a few hoops with a youth basketball group before hitting the road for SUNY Binghamton. 

Andrew Courtney / Two-Row Wampum Renewal Campaign

The paddlers have returned home, unpacked, rested, and are now processing the past few weeks of a historic canoe trip, aimed at renewing the promise of a 400-year-old treaty.  It all began in early July, on Onondaga Nation Lands on Onondaga Creek, and ended about a week ago in New York City.  Native peoples and non-Natives formed two lines representing the Two-Row Wampum, with hopes of educating people along their journey about the treaty that once bound the two peoples and bringing new focus to the importance of environmental cleanup and preservation.

Scott Willis, WAER News

Syracuse mayoral candidate Pat Hogan wrapped up his weekly policy agenda announcements Monday by unveiling his plan to re-build the city’s neighborhoods.  

In previous weeks, Hogan has released his plans for improving education, equal rights, public safety, and jobs and the economy.  Hogan says focusing on the social fabric of the city is also important. 

Hogan says he’ll be just as engaged and accessible when he’s mayor as he is as common councilor.  Alfonso Davis is also in the race to try and unseat incumbent Stephanie Miner. 

"Save the Rain" Proposals Tabled...For Now

Aug 16, 2013
Save the Rain Westcott
Save the Rain

Onondaga County lawmakers are holding off for now on funding any new “Save the Rain” projects.  The Ways and Means Committee met today to discuss plans for $2 million worth of ‘installation and infiltration’ projects—or INI’s—to manage rainfall in suburban communities. 

Legislator Casey Jordan says the projects sound promising, but he wants to know what it will cost the County to collect each gallon of rainwater.

 

 

Scott Willis, WAER News

The transgender community in Syracuse fears for its safety now that the killer of a young trans-woman is free. 

Green’s mother Roxanne says she has little faith in the legal system, after the Appellate Court in Rochester released Dwight DeLee on probation last week.

Mayor Stephanie Miner
Miner for Mayor

Syracuse’s Democratic state lawmakers say Mayor Stephanie Miner has been a tireless advocate of Syracuse and a close partner in government. 

Assemblymembers Bill Magnarelli and Sam Roberts, plus Senator Dave Valesky endorsed Miner’s campaign for re-election today in front of H.W. Smith school.  The building is the last to be renovated under phase one of the massive Joint Schools Construction Project.  Bill Magnarelli says Miner made sure legislation for phase two made it through the legislature:

Maria Catanzarite, WAER News

Senator Chuck Schumer stopped by Syracuse Tuesday to call on the Federal Transportation Department to propose a fix for flawed rail cars called the DOT 111. 

He says the hundreds of cars that travel through the center of Syracuse every day are the same ones that derailed in Quebec a few weeks ago, killing dozens and wiping out a small town.  

Maria Catanzarite, WAER News

The Syracuse Common Council is contemplating merging city vehicle maintenance and repairs under one roof. Councilors met with city department heads Monday morning.

With more than one-thousand City-owned vehicles on the streets, Council Committee members think one building will be enough to service all five departments. Councilor Helen Hudson says cutting costs is the main reason behind the proposal.

Chris Bolt, WAER News

Syracuse mayoral candidate Pat Hogan further expanded his campaign platform Monday by releasing his Equal Rights Plan.

CHAT Camp Helps Non-Verbal Kids Connect

Aug 9, 2013
Maria Catanzarite, WAER News

The Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University brought together five area children to take part in a week-long camp for kids who chat a bit differently. Everyone has a voice—some just use the touch of a screen. 

Today was the final day of the first-ever CHAT camp, or also known as the camp of “communicative hope through assistive technology.” Speech and language pathologist Beth Tollar thinks kids with unique ways of speaking need to know they aren’t alone.

Pages