All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4-6:30 PM
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  

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Religion
5:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Southern Baptist Leaders Seek Softer Approach To Homosexuality

Pastor Jimmy Scroggins (right) tells other Southern Baptist leaders to be compassionate to gay people during a leadership summit in April.
ERLC Leadership Summit/Flickr

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 6:29 pm

Some Christian denominations around the U.S. have been slowly warming to the idea of gay marriage. A few have even made an about-face.

Not so with the country's largest protestant group, Southern Baptists. The Southern Baptist Convention still preaches that marriage can only be between one man and one woman. But some pastors are softening their message.

A Change Of Tone

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This Week's Must Read
5:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Ancient Skeleton In Mexico Sheds Light On Americas Settlement

In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes the Naia skull found at the site.
Paul Nicklen AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:00 pm

The nearly complete skeleton of a teenage girl who died some 12,000 to 13,000 years ago in a cave in the Yucatan Peninsula, has yielded DNA clues linking her to Native Americans living today.

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NPR Story
4:57 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

What's In A Name? Plenty Of Ways To Make A Mistake

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:00 pm

When Arizona State University graduates hear their names announced, they have Peter Lafford to thank. It's his job to ensure students' names are pronounced correctly — and it's not always an easy task.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
4:12 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

European Ruling On Removing Google Links May Leave A Mess

Legal experts say it's too soon to know the impact of a European court ruling that will require Google to remove some links upon request.
Virginia Mayo AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:31 pm

Google's lawyers are trying to make sense of a ruling they did not expect.

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