Here and Now

Weekdays at Noon - 2 PM

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Emmy and Peabody award winning Robin Young brings more than 25 years of broadcast experience to her role as host of Here & Now. Co-host Jeremy Hobson worked at Marketplace for six years and was also a producer for NPR's All Things Considered and Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! in addition to experience as a reporter for several NPR member stations.

A new study out this week has found that around a third of trials that look at antibiotics don’t report safety results, and almost a third didn’t report adverse affects of using probiotics.

Lynn Visson is a teacher and writer, and was an interpreter at the United Nations for 22 years, interpreting French and Russian into English for politicians like former President Jimmy Carter.

Speed is key when doing high-stakes interpreting with delegates and other notable figures, Visson tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

In Illinois, prisoners with disabilities may end up staying behind bars, long after their release date has passed. Most inmates are put on mandatory supervised release, which requires a person to have stable housing before they can leave prison. An analysis by WBEZ in Chicago found many facilities on the department’s housing directory could not take people who use a wheelchair.

Wimbledon is the world’s oldest tennis tournament, and it occupies a special place in the hearts of many players. Former champion Boris Becker once called it the most important tournament there is. It’s also a summer tradition across Britain, even for those who aren’t lucky enough to nab tickets.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with The Independent’s tennis corespondent Paul Newman about what makes Wimbledon unique, and the role of tradition at the tournament.

After days of breathless waiting, people around the world watched as 12 boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand were rescued by military divers.

The story captivated audiences for weeks. But other concurrent disasters, like deadly flooding in Japan and the wreck of a tourist boat off the Thai coast, received less attention.

Trap shooting teams used to be found on many high school campuses in New York’s North Country. They lost favor amid the push for stricter gun laws. But now, the sport’s coming back: Over the last couple years, 16 trap shooting teams have started up in the region. They’re coed, with members as young as 12.

A new study published this week in the field of senolytics might provide a key to anti-aging. Scientists have found that in using compounds to kill off so-called senescent, or aging, cells, the lifespan and agility of mice increased.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sharon Begley (@sxbegle), senior science writer at the health and medicine publication STAT.

Whitney Houston’s rise to music stardom began when she was in her early 20s with the release of her debut album in 1985. She went on to become one of the best-selling musical artists of all time.

But behind the scenes, her personal life was bedeviled by drugs, family and marital issues. Houston died of an accidental drowning involving drugs in a hotel bathtub at age 48.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR) about President Trump’s choice for the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh.

Recently in the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona, more than 100 wild horses were found dead — drowned in the thick mud surrounding a dried-up watering hole. The images, some of the most alarming published about the drought that’s been plaguing the Southwest, have prompted people both on and off the reservation to take action.

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