Here and Now

Weekdays at Noon - 2 PM

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Emmy and Peabody award winning Robin Young brings more than 25 years of broadcast experience to her role as host of Here & Now. Co-host Jeremy Hobson worked at Marketplace for six years and was also a producer for NPR's All Things Considered and Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! in addition to experience as a reporter for several NPR member stations.

A majority of Americans think that editing a baby’s genes before birth should be illegal, according to a new poll from STAT and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The poll finds that 65 percent of people think that altering an unborn baby’s genes for the sake of preventing a serious genetic disease should be illegal. And 83 percent believe that genetic editing for the sake of improving IQ or looks should be illegal.

For this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions, host Jeremy Hobson talks with Rhonda LeValdo, host of Native Spirit at KKFI community radio in Kansas City, Missouri. She plays music from Native American artists, ranging from traditional music to rock and rap.

Texas State Representative Lyle Larson says the last time his state mattered in a presidential primary was in 1976, between Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan.

Larson proposes a rotating schedule during the primary election process to highlight more populous states, and those with more diverse communities. He talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about his proposal and the likelihood of it succeeding.

The Justice Department says it is considering taking legal actions against the city of Ferguson, Missouri, after Ferguson city councilors unanimously voted last night to amend and potentially gut a negotiated agreement to reform the city’s police department and municipal court.

The agreement came after the 2014 killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown by a white police officer.

Killings Of Muslim Students Spark Awakening

Feb 10, 2016

It’s been a year since the murder of three Muslim-American students in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Since then, their families have been working to reshape the narrative around Muslims in America. Jorge Valencia from the Here & Now contributor network WUNC reports.

Next up: Nevada. Democrats hold their caucuses – the first in the West – on Saturday Feb. 20. Republicans will vote in a caucus of their own Feb. 23, a few days after South Carolina.

Nevada is a large state with a diverse population, which will present new challenges to candidates in both parties. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Joe Schoenmann from KNPR about the new challenges facing the candidates.

One of Denver’s oldest movie rental stores is now one of the city’s last. Video One has survived the rise and fall of mega chains like Blockbuster and it’s still here during the age of online streaming. But as arts reporter Corey Jones of Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio explains, Video One may need to close its doors.

Carole Soule and her husband Bruce Dawson run Miles Smith Farm in Loudon, New Hampshire. They produce meat, and have Scottish Highlander cattle, pigs, rabbits, a couple horses, chickens and geese.

Soule says farming is important in New Hampshire and she is taking advantage of primary season to give the farming community more attention. She has attended several candidate events, and even brought her animals along to some of them.

She spoke with Here & Now‘s Robin Young at her farm.

During her election road trip covering the New Hampshire primary, Here & Now‘s Robin Young stopped by Toni Halla‘s general store in Canterbury, N.H. Halla runs the Canterbury Country Store with her husband, Joe. Many residents were at the store as well, and they were eager to talk politics.

Last night Beyoncé performed during the Super Bowl 50 halftime show. It seemed to be business as usual: leotard, hair blowing thanks to a wind machine and a squad of dancers backing her up. But was it business as usual?

The lyrics to her new song “Formation,” which was released on Saturday are more racially driven than anything she has ever sung before.

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