Morning Edition

Weekdays 5-9 AM
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Middle East
5:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

2 Democratic Senators Propose Alternate Plan For Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

President Obama on Tuesday meets with Democratic senators to press his case for military action against Syria. Two moderate senators are offering an alternative plan. It would delay military action for 45 days, and give Bashar Assad another chance to get rid of his chemical weapons. Steve Inskeep talks to Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota about the plan.

Politics
5:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Tea Party Won't Let Congress Forget Obamacare Issues

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Congress did not expect to spend September debating Syria. Many Republicans, instead, were planning battles over the budget and over the healthcare law that's about to take affect. Tea Party activists are going ahead with meetings on their issues. One event comes in Washington D.C. today. NPR's Don Gonyea has been talking with activists.

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Asia
5:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

India Court Convicts 4 Men In Fatal Gang Rape

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A judge in New Delhi has just delivered his guilty verdict for four men who raped and murdered a young woman on a city bus back in December. It was one of the most high profile cases in Indian history. The horrific crime stirred a national debate over the country's lax prosecution of crimes against women and became an international issue as well. We talk to NPR's Julie McCarthy who was at the courthouse. Good morning.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Politics
3:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Colorado Voters To Decide 2 Lawmakers' Fates In Recall Elections

State Sens. Angela Giron and John Morse, both Democrats, face recall elections Tuesday. The battle in Colorado has attracted major players from across the nation, reflecting the sustained intensity over the issue of gun rights.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:01 pm

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

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Author Interviews
3:05 am
Tue September 10, 2013

During Katrina, 'Memorial' Doctors Chose Who Lived, Who Died

Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2005.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

On Aug. 30, 2005, a doctor climbed the stairs through a New Orleans hospital to the helipad, which was rarely used, and so old and rusted it wasn't even painted with the hospital's current name.

From that helipad over Memorial Medical Center, the doctor looked out over New Orleans, now flooding after Hurricane Katrina. He considered the more than 2,000 people in the hospital below — 244 of them patients.

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