Morning Edition

Weekdays at 5-9 AM
  • Hosted by Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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American troops liberated Dachau concentration camp 70 years ago Wednesday. Scores of survivors and World War II veterans are gathering there to commemorate the event, the biggest ceremony of which will be on Sunday.

Located in a wooded patch north of Munich, Dachau opened in 1933 as the Nazis' first concentration camp, not long after Adolf Hitler came to power.

Copyright 2015 Chicago Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wbez.org.

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Police In Baltimore Clear Defiant Crowds

Apr 29, 2015
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For A Resume, Type Font Matters

Apr 28, 2015

Before you even get your foot in the door of your next job, your resume can say a lot about you — starting with typeface.

"Using Times New Roman is the typeface equivalent of wearing sweatpants to an interview," Bloomberg says in an article in which it turns to typography experts to ask which typefaces work and which don't.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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In a few words, here is the defense for the Boston Marathon bomber. He was drawn into the deadly plot by his older brother.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tyson Foods, the country's biggest poultry producer, is promising to stop feeding its chickens any antibiotics that are used in human medicine.

It's the most dramatic sign so far of a major shift by the poultry industry. The speed with which chicken producers have turned away from antibiotics, in fact, has surprised some of the industry's longtime critics.

For decades, the farmers who raise chickens, pigs and cattle have used antibiotics as part of a formula for growing more animals, and growing them more cheaply.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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