Morning Edition

Weekdays at 5-9 AM
  • Hosted by Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Let's take a moment to appreciate science. No doubt you've been hearing all about the eclipse that'll be visible across America in about a week. But imagine someone thousands of years ago who saw the sun disappear and didn't know why.

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North Korea is keeping up its aggressive tone against the United States, warning it is, quote, "seriously examining a plan" to fire four missiles into the sea near the U.S. territory of Guam.

Delray Beach's charming downtown, palm trees and waves attract locals, vacationers and, increasingly, drug users who come here to try to get off opioids. In some parts of the small Florida community, there's a residential program for people recovering from addiction — a sober living house or "sober home" — on nearly every block. Sometimes two or three.

Cat Becomes Cardinals' Good Luck Charm

Aug 10, 2017

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. Last night, announcers for the Kansas City Royals seemed to be making fun of a kitten who wandered onto the outfield.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER #1: Are all these fans cheering for me?

Beware Of Rocks By The River

Aug 10, 2017

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