acr health

Scott Willis / WAER News

About two dozen health services providers and other Syracuse-area stakeholders gathered Wednesday to discuss strategies to make hepatitis C screening and care more of a priority in New York State.  About 200,000 New Yorkers are living with chronic hepatitis C, and half of those infected are unaware of their status. Policy analyst at the grassroots group VOCAL-NY Clifton Garmon says the state needs to know hepatitis Cis a problem.


One display at the New York State Fair Wednesday was trying to help people save lives in the face of the national heroin and opiate overdose epidemic.  A-C-R Health employees know all too well the impacts of the addiction.

Arise's facebook page /

  Two of the community’s longest-serving leaders in the human services field are retiring Thursday.   Michael Crinnin has been executive director of ACR Health, formerly Aids Community Resources, for more than 26 years.  Before that, he served as founding executive director of Arise for 10 years starting in 1979.  Meanwhile, Tom McKeown has been executive director of Arise since 2002.  Both men have spent their careers in human services, and both have seen significant, perhaps monumental changes concerning those with disabilities and HIV/AIDs during their long careers.

  Qualifying Central New Yorkers will be able to sign up for new low-cost health insurance starting Nov. 1.

The Essential Plan is an extension of the Affordable Care Act and will cover people who have enrolled starting January first. Any working person who makes under $24,000 qualifies. With the plan, people would receive free insurance from one of the major carriers that covers all essential health benefits.

  A local healthcare professional strongly supports a new plan to lower HIV and AIDS within the state. The new blueprint comes from Governor Andrew Cuomo and  aims to lower infections from 3000 a year to 750 a year and to eventually end new AIDS cases by 2020.

John Smith/WAER News

  Obama care goes into its second enrollment period beginning this Saturday, and one local organization aims to make that process faster and easier.

A-C-R Health opened a new office in Syracuse to assist residents with signing up for healthcare through the Affordable Care Act.

Assistant Director of Insurance Services Steve Wood, says about 50% of people who sign up, enroll online by themselves, but they do not complete the application correctly. He says that's where A-C-R Health can help. 

  ACR Health’s second annual Red Carpet Extravaganza will have song, dance and drag performances, while also educating the community about HIV and AIDS.  Intervention specialist Daniel Reed says statistics show which people are more likely to contract the disease. 

In 2010, young gay bisexual men accounted for 72 percent of the new HIV infections among all persons aged 13 to 24…even though they represent just two percent of the U.S. population.  Reed says the statistics should inspire the community to get involved in finding solutions. 

governor shaking hands with bystanders at the pride parade

Central New York health agencies are praising Governor Cuomo’s efforts to put an end to the AIDS epidemic in New York State. Governor Cuomo announced his plan on Sunday, the same day as New York City’s PRIDE Parade. Cuomo’s goal is to reduce the number of HIV infections to 750 cases a year by the year 2020.

Young men of color in Central New York have one of the highest rates of HIV infection in the state, and one organization is trying to reach them to get tested.  

 Friday is National HIV Testing Day, which wraps up a week dedicated to increasing the number of those who know their status, not only for their own good, but also to avoid spreading the disease.  

  The Care Network provides education to schools and community members to spread awareness that people living with HIV can still lead long, prosperous lives. 

Keegan Tatum / WAER News

Local ambulances and hospitals in Onondaga County have had access to a reversal agent that stops the effects of heroin and opiate pain killers to prevent overdoses for about a month. Now, through a grant, ACR Health in Syracuse is offering training programs for people to get legally trained to administer the drug in the event someone they know is overdosing.