Cancer

https://www.whitehouse.gov/

Upstate Medical University Cancer Center researchers are optimistic that the recent “Cancer Moonshot” initiative by the White House will bring positive advancements towards treating the disease. Professor Leszek Kotula says this new push will help expand research efforts.

John Smith / WAER News

  Cupcakes crowned with multi-colored frosting with butterfly rings capped off a check presentation at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital in Syracuse on Wednesday.  Even sweeter was a $240,000 check from Paige’s Butterfly Run fundraiser held last summer and from events held throughout the year. It’s the largest gift to the hospital’s pediatric's unit received this year.  Paige Yeomans Arnold, whom the fund is named after, died of complications of her treatment for Leukemia in 1994.

Scott Willis / WAER News

The efforts of more than 2,500 runners were recognized today after they raised nearly a quarter of a million dollars in memory of a first grader from Baldwinsville who died of leukemia 20 years ago.    The parents of Paige Yeomans Arnold presented a check to Upstate’s Golisano Children’s Hospital for the $224,000 dollars raised from Paige’s Butterfly Run and other events this year.  Upstate CEO Dr. John McCabe says the money will go towards pediatric cancer research and other support programs.  

  Deaths from Cervical Cancer have dropped dramatically in the last two decades due to regular screenings becoming more routine.  WAER continues our series on cancer screening and prevention today.  Some new developments are not changing the advice of medical experts – yet.

acscan.org

  New York Cancer prevention officials are recognizing the 50th anniversary of the study that began decades of trying to get people to either quit – or never start – smoking.  

Dan Maffei and Leslie Kohman
Darryl Geddes / Upstate University Medical Center

Construction on the Upstate Cancer Research Center at University Hospital in Syracuse is rapidly taking shape. 

The center will have a variety of medical services in a centralized location.  Many services are already being offered, like a specialized psychologist, who works to help the emotional and psychological needs that cancer patients and families deal with, and an integrated medicine specialist, who advises patients on non-traditional therapies they may wish to add to their traditional treatment methods. 

Many local women and several groups got together Wednesday to bring more attention to a type of cancer that can go undetected.  For two of them Ovarian Cancer Day is very personal.