City of Syracuse

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  Governor Cuomo was in town today to celebrate two local businesses’ plans to create and retain 450 jobs in Downtown Syracuse. The newly restored Hotel Syracuse was the backdrop for his remarks about the economic revitalization happening in Upstate New York State.

“Hotel Syracuse reborn, new advanced manufacturing high-tech companies locating in downtown Syracuse, who ten years ago would have been on the first plane to Austin, Texas or to South Carolina now locating here because they see the economic future.”

cnysme.org

One of the officials closely tied to business development for the City of Syracuse during the past six years is taking a job in the private sector.  Deputy Commissioner Ben Walsh has led the way on a number of important projects, but knows many challenges remain.  He says things have taken shape since he was appointed in 2010 at the end of the recession.

City of Syracuse

The City of Syracuse is continuing its partnership with an S.U. geography professor in an effort to tackle the city’s most pressing infrastructure problems.  University students will help the city’s innovation team with research and investigation in hopes of identifying solutions.

  Assistant Professor Jonnell Robinson has been Syracuse’s community geographer for more than a decade.  Now as a faculty fellow with the innovation team, she knows there are challenges ahead to address infrastructure that’s hidden and taken mostly for granted.

City of Syracuse Flickr

  The City of Syracuse continues the emergency demolition of 331 S. Salina St. after the building partially collapsed on Feb. 4.  South Salina St. between Fayette St. and Jefferson St. remains closed to vehicular traffic until further notice. 

The narrow, five-story structure has been vacant for many years. Its ownership has been in dispute for at least two years. The owner of the building says he will reimburse the city for the $235,000 cost of demolishing the structure. Syracuse.com reports this is one of four buildings owned by a Brooklyn real estate investor. 

downtownsyracuse.com

  Syracuse Economic Officials know the area has some advantages for businesses to move here, and boost employment.  Now they’re hearing this might be the ‘best place in the nation’ for certain kinds of jobs.  

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  Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner proposes a city budget that holds the line on taxes, sewer and water fees.  Miner says in a release she’s keeping the city a good place to live.

 “From continued investments in programs like Say Yes to Education, we are demonstrating we are willing to make big ideas work for the people of our community. Additionally, by not raising taxes, water rates, and sewer rates, we are keeping Syracuse an affordable City where people can live, work, and raise a family.”

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  About 150 families in Syracuse could find out in the next few weeks if they’ll have to pony up as much as $1200-a-year for flood insurance…even though the city doesn’t think they’re in any danger of a flood.  

John Smith/WAER News

  A new $63 million surgical tower at St. Joseph’s Hospital is complete and ready to open later this month. The 104,000 square-foot addition features 110 private rooms with a view of Syracuse’s North Side Neighborhood. The hospital says research has shown private rooms create a healing environment that leads to people healing at a faster rate. Dr. Howard Zucker, the acting State Health Commissioner, says years ago, people’s senses automatically made them feel hospitals are not a place they would want to go visit.

Hannah Warren/WAER News

  Just down the road from our studio is a historic sculpture garden that used to be a hangout for the city’s elite. It just may not be the kind of public park you’d normally imagine.

In the early eighteen hundreds, Oakwood Cemetery – which is now just off Comstock Avenue – was where the wealthy gathered for leisure time and picnics.

taking the tarp off a wooden parks sign
John Smith / WAER News

It’s been a long time coming, but Heath Park in Syracuse now has another entrance.  SUNY Environmental College of Science and Forestry has officially given two acres of land that borders a residential neighborhood to the city parks department.  

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