Ed Riley

John Smith/WAERNews

The developer of the Marriott Syracuse Downtown is taking on another multi-million dollar building renovation project right across the street.  The old Symphony Tower, which was once connected to the old hotel by a pedestrian bridge, will take $24 to $26 million to complete and will be up and running by next fall, according to Co-Owner, Ed Riley.  He says that amount factors in the work that’s previously been performed and what’s left to complete.  Riley doesn’t think the new Hyatt brand hotel will  compete with the Marriott.

John Smith/WAER News

The new Marriott Syracuse Downtown is open and ready for business.  The official opening ceremony was held this morning at the new main entrance on East Onondaga Street.  After the doors closed in 2004, there was a decade of uncertainty for the hotel which originally opened in 1924.  However, one local man with a vision and expertise to restore large hotels tried to keep it from becoming obsolete.  Ed Riley has never been one to take full credit for the $74 million dollar transformation.

John Smith / WAER News

Walking into the Hotel Syracuse is like witnessing a rebirth of historic tracings of the past.  The man responsible for rescuing the hotel was honored today.  The Onondaga Historical Society presented the Owner, Ed Riley with the OHA Medal Award recognizing outstanding and meritorious service to local history.

John Smith, WAER News

The renovations of the former Hotel Syracuse are ongoing inside and out and the sunshine beamed inside of two completed rooms that were unveiled today.  The Hotel will become a Marriot.  The Owner's Manager Member, Ed Riley is largely credited with saving the hotel.  He says the wooden doors leading to the rooms date back to 1924 and are being refurbished locally by Stickley.

Scott Willis / WAER News

  The renovation of the historic Hotel Syracuse will also bring with it a new name.  The announcement came Thursday in the dusty lobby from Hotel Owner Ed Riley.

Scott Willis / WAER News

The renovation of older buildings in Syracuse and Upstate New York could face a more uncertain future without a popular economic development tool.  Those hoping to save the federal Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit form the chopping block in Congress gathered Tuesday in the Persian Terrace at the Hotel Syracuse to sound the alarm.  The hotel’s lead developer Ed Riley has his credit already in hand, and says the project wouldn’t be possible without it.  

wikipedia.org

  The Hotel Syracuse is now in the hands of a developer who plans to reopen it.  No one has rented a room there in more than a decade…but city leaders are optimistic that will change, after the Syracuse Industrial Development Agency took possession, then transferred it over.

Optimism Grows for the Future of the Hotel Syracuse

Mar 26, 2014
Herald Tribune

It’s been a long time since anyone has danced in the Grand Ballroom or the Persian Terrace at Hotel Syracuse. A series of various ownership changes and financial problems have long plagued the hotel.  Earlier this month though, the Syracuse Industrial Development Agency took the first steps to prepare to use eminent domain to get the hotel foreclosed and sold to a willing buyer.  A businessman from Camillus wants to rehabilitate the hotel.  If the Hotel Syracuse does re-open, Onondaga County could benefit by booking more conventions at the OnCenter.