Gun Violence

John Smith/WAER News

The impact of gun violence in is seen and heard on a regular basis in Syracuse.  Parents Rita and John Fredette know this firsthand.  Their son Joshua was killed in 2005.

"A monster stole the breath away from my son," Rita Fredette said.   "No matter what we all do to stop  and impact violence, that cannot heal my heart.  

"How do you get well?  I don't know," John Fredette said.  "Every day is yesterday, July 2, 2005."

Scott Willis / WAER News

  Law enforcement officials  and gun safety advocates say the key to reducing the gun violence in Syracuse is to stop the flood of guns trafficked here from other states.  Mayor Stephanie Miner and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand convened a roundtable discussion Friday at the Southwest Community Center to discuss proposed federal legislation that would make gun trafficking across state lines a crime. 

Danforth Middle School Students Hold Peace Parade to End Local Gun Violence

Dec 3, 2015
Matthew Gutierrez

  More than 100 Danforth Middle School students braved the rain and cold Thursday afternoon for a peace parade to call for an end gun violence in their neighborhoods.

The march was part of a program that featured presentations from Mayor Stephanie Miner and other community leaders. Seventh grader Agnes Niyuker  says the purpose of the march is to spread the word that safer streets will give students a better chance to grow as young citizens.   

New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services / New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services

  Syracuse and Onondaga County will share nearly $1.2 million in grant money on what experts say are programs proven to reduce gun violence and homicides. It’s the fourth highest award in the state among the 17 counties reporting 87 percent of the violent crime outside of New York City.  Mike Green heads the state Division of Criminal Justice Services, which administers the grants.  He says jurisdictions have wide leeway in how they use the funding, with the caveat that any spending on additional officers or overtime goes to support specific, evidence-based strategies.

  A Syracuse gang prevention program is getting some significant financial backing from the state – hoping to make a difference where law enforcement can’t.  

Railroad Spike jewelry
Liberty United

Guns currently in possession of the Syracuse Police will now be headed for new lives – as high-end jewelry.  The city announced a partnership today with a company called Liberty United, which melts down the metal from guns and turns the new alloys into bracelets, necklaces and rings.  Money from selling the jewelry is directed back to gun-violence prevention programs in participating communities. 

Valerie Crowder, WAER News

The George Zimmerman verdict has sparked a local conversation about disproportionate jury representation, racial disparities in school suspensions and gang-related gun violence.