immigrants

Chris Bolt/WAER News

The Onondaga County/ Syracuse Human Rights Commission honored International Human Rights Day with speakers at All Saints  Roman Catholic Church that reminded people of violence and discrimination faced by LGBTQ community members, those with disabilities, and people who've immigrated or resettled here from other countries.  Commission Executive Director Barrie Gewanter noted human rights day came out of the International Declaration of human rights adopted in 1948.  

Jon Shames / WAER News

Chants for freedom reverberated through the streets of downtown Syracuse Thursday as dozens of activists gathered to urge Congressmember John Katko to co-sponsor what they call a "Clean Dream Act." It’s part of a coordinated nationwide Dream Act Week of Action while Congress is in recess.  Gustavo Andrade is director of leadership development with United We Dream. 

WAER Archive

Advocates in here in Syracuse and in New York State are standing behind refugees and immigrants against policy statements from Washington. In the wake of Attorney General Sessions’ threat to cut funding from sanctuary cities, Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner is holding firm, even after a threat by Attorney General Jeff Sessions to cut funds from sanctuary cities.

Reena Tretler/WAER News

The crowd at Syracuse's Hancock Airport flooded the main terminal Sunday night, with people filling the upstairs common areas as well.  It was all part of a protest against the immigration ban imposed by executive order by President Donald Trump over the weekend. 

Chants rang out several times: "No ban, no registry, this is our Democracy" chimed one.  Another said, "Muslims are welcome here; No hate, no fear."  And a lengthy chant said, "Down with white supremacy; no ban, no registry."

commons.wikimedia.org

Immigrant students can now attend high school in Utica after a settlement agreement was reached with the district.  The suit Tuyizere vs. Utica was filed by the New York Civil Liberties Union and Legal Services of Central New York last April on behalf of six students who were repeatedly denied enrollment in Proctor high school after months of letters, phone calls, and threats of litigation.  Legal Services staff attorney Susan Young says the students had been placed in alternative programs in violation of state law that guarantees a free public education to anyone under 21.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Nearly 100 Central New Yorkers  crowded into the Empire Room at the state fairgrounds Friday to take the oath of allegiance to become citizens of the United States.   They originate from  40 countries...from Bangladesh and Iran to New Zealand and Vietnam.  19-year-old Michael Malinowski of Syracuse came to the U.S.from Poland when he was 12.  He says he’ll always have a place in his heart for his homeland, but is proud to follow in the footsteps of his grandfather who was with him Friday.  

Scott willis / WAER News

A Syracuse-based immigration attorney says President Obama’s executive order to protect millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation is a good first step…but could have gone farther. Jose Perez says even though the action is based on family unity, it doesn’t help everyone.  

Under the president’s executive order, undocumented immigrants who have been in the U.S. for at least five years and have children born in the U.S. would get a reprieve from deportation and be eligible to apply for work permits.  Perez says he’s already getting calls from clients asking if they qualify.  

Immigrant farmworkers are among those who say they appreciate the president's efforts, but the executive order won't help many of them.  

Naturally, republicans in congress are furious, and say the president’s action all but kills any future chances for comprehensive immigration reform.  Immigration attorney Jose Perez wonders wants to ask them why.