Mayor Stephanie Miner

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  Several Central New York health, labor and civic groups joined Mayor Stephanie Miner Thursday to warn against a huge interruption of health care.  They want to make sure before congress repeals the Affordable Care Act, there’s a replacement in place.  A big part of their message is that many things are impacted if people lose insurance.  Miner highlights some of the concerns she’s heard.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner delivered her final state of the city address Thursday night…a message that was decidedly more reflective on the accomplishments of her past seven years in office.  She highlighted successes in city schools, with the Land Bank, and using new technology and data to tackle the city’s daunting infrastructure challenges.  Miner also touched on downtown and neighborhood development.

John Smith / WAER News

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner has made some adjustments to her administrative staff in part to prepare for the uncertainty surrounding a Trump presidency. The appointments will fill out the final year of her tenure.

Most appointments at this point late in a mayoral administration are typically more significant internally than they are to the public.

Miner asked current corporation counsel Bob Stamey to take back his old job as personnel director. She said this shuffling of staff is more strategic.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner is getting behind a program she says could prevent families from becoming homeless.  A state proposal called The Home Stability Support program would provide a new rent supplement for those who are eligible for public assistance.  Miner says the program could expand upon the efforts of the city and county to keep families out of shelters and off the streets.

Katie Zilcosky / WAER News

A new report released Wednesday by the State Comptroller shows that Central New York’s post-recession economy remains in a state of transition when factoring in unemployment, poverty and large employers moving out.  However, there are bright spots including a workforce of young adults who attended college locally, a technically experienced workforce, and a lower cost of living.  Tom DiNapoli has been focused on auditing economic development programs such as Start-Up New York and others which aims to lure new companies and create new jobs. He says there’s room for improvement.

Scott Willis/WAER News

Syracuse Police have identified the suspect who died in Sunday night’s shootout with police near Syracuse University.  Police say 41-year-old Deric Brown of Syracuse was pulled over on the 600 block of Walnut Avenue for driving with no headlights.  Chief Frank Fowler says the officer noticed the handle of a handgun in the car, and told the suspect to keep his hands up as  he began walking back to his patrol car. Folwer says that's when Brown exited his vehicle fired multiple shots at the officer, who fired back, striking Brown at least once.

Karen Dewitt

  It’s supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s convention, but all of the focus Monday was on her primary challenger Bernie Sanders and his delegates, who continue to stew over a wikileaks release of DNC emails that showed favoritism to Clinton over Sanders.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

  A unique approach to housing the homeless took a step forward today when a small duplex opened in Syracuse to give two people a home of their own.  The tiny homes might be a novelty; the purpose might also be unique.

Jeremiah Thompson/WAER News

A crowd of people marched Syracuse streets today to demand an end to violence and call for better treatment by Police.  Organizer Shauna Spivey-Spinner believes better relations in each community can help.

“We need community policing.  We need to know the cops in our neighborhoods and they need to know us.  You can’t expect someone from Solvay to come and work on the Northside when they know nothing about our neighborhoods so we need community policing.  We need to know who these cops are so we can trust them, because trust needs to be built.”  

John Smith/WAER News

The impact of gun violence in is seen and heard on a regular basis in Syracuse.  Parents Rita and John Fredette know this firsthand.  Their son Joshua was killed in 2005.

"A monster stole the breath away from my son," Rita Fredette said.   "No matter what we all do to stop  and impact violence, that cannot heal my heart.  

"How do you get well?  I don't know," John Fredette said.  "Every day is yesterday, July 2, 2005."

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