Move to Amend

Scott Willis / WAER News

  The effort to take large amounts of anonymous campaign donations out of political campaigns came to Syracuse City Hall Monday where common councilors approved a resolution supporting a constitutional amendment to overturn the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 "Citizens United" ruling.  

Councilor Jean Kessner voted yes because she supports the sentiment.  But she feels a constitutional amendment is a very slow path to get the results they want.

Move to Amend website.

A national Democracy Activist speaking tonight (6/2/2014) in Syracuse is hoping to keep the momentum going for a movement to end Corporate Personhood.  In essence, he says it provides for the same rights as humans.  Move to Amend Spokesperson David Cobb says the problem is that several laws safeguard corporations through constitutional rights.

Tony Cresswell.

  A group of Central New Yorkers joined a number of democracy groups in calling on state lawmakers to help limit the influence of money in politics.  

people with large signs saying corporations are not people, money is not speech
Move to Amend

Rallies are being held in Syracuse and across the country today in reaction to the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down overall limits on political contributions.  The 5 to 4 ruling in McCutcheon vs. FEC allows a single donor to give up to $3.5 million per election cycle to a political party.  The court’s majority said the previous $123,200 cap violated the First Amendment.  

Scott Willis / WAER News

Central New Yorkers opposed to the U-S Supreme Court’s Citizens United Decision marked the 4th anniversary of the ruling Tuesday by vowing to overturn it.  Supporters of the group Move to Amend want a constitutional amendment that would reverse what they say is corporations growing financial and corrupting influence on elections.   Group co-chair Michael Messina-Yauchzy  says we need to remember the first words of the constitution.