Onondaga County

Scott Willis / WAER News

The state of New York is partnering with communication companies as part of a continuing effort to push broadband into more isolated areas.  Without broadband, people in these areas rely on dial-up internet, which means lower transfer speeds and available bandwidth.

Kijin Higashibaba

The original construction of Interstate 81 through Syracuse changed the city and region forever. Now there are plans to tear down the highway and there are some who see the replacement process as a chance to help Syracuse’s poverty problem.  The highway and poverty are linked in surprising ways, WAER's Kijin Higashibaba reports in Part 2 of their examination of I-81 and poverty. 

Go to citylimitsproject.org to hear the full, unabridged version of this episode. 

City Limits: I-81 And Racial Segregation In Syracuse

Mar 7, 2018

Interstate 81 that runs through Syracuse has outlived its useful life and there are plans to tear it down. What comes next is a very hot topic at the moment. There are some who see the future of the highway as an opportunity to make a difference in the staggering racial segregation and poverty in the city. As a part of WAER's Poverty Project, Kijin Higashibaba look into the highway's past to understand why. 

Go to citylimitsproject.org to hear the full, unabridged version of this episode. 

Scott Willis / WAER News

Onondaga County’s health commissioner says recent rankings of the community’s overall health indicate our behaviors are more of a factor in determining health outcomes more than the availability and quality of care. While residents can make better choices, social and economic factors also come in to play. 

Commissioner Dr. Indu Gupta says the big picture is key when looking at a person’s overall health. 

"In public health we say ‘everything affects health,’ and then also ‘health affects everything.’"

Chris Bolt / WAER News

A new AAA report shows that nearly 4,000 tickets were issued to motorists in Onondaga County in 2015 for using their cell phones and texting while driving.  Legislative analyst and report author Alex Slatky called the situation ‘an epidemic’ and said people need to be more aware of the severity of distracted driving.

Plastic Bag Waste Becoming a Growing Concern in New York State

Mar 27, 2017
Scott Willis / WAER News

Twenty-three billion. That’s the number of plastic bags New Yorkers use every year. Governor Andrew Cuomo recently launched a task force to address the issue. Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency Executive Director Dereth Glance says plastic bags never really break down and decompose. If they’re not recycled properly, Glance says they can cause harm to the environment.

Jason Chen / WAER News

Onondaga County is taking steps to reduce animal abuse in Central New York. Sheriff Eugene Conway today announced that his office would create and host an animal abuser registry to prevent animals from falling into the hands of abusers.

“Animal cruelty is a serious problem, and while New York has criminalized the cruel treatment of animals, animal abuse and cruelty continues to occur here in Onondaga County and elsewhere.”

nysba.org

The New York State Bar Association is joining civil liberties and other groups in trying to get better legal help for the state’s poor citizens.  Onondaga County is at the center of the controversy over providing fair legal representation.

John Smith

An Onondaga County grand jury has concluded that a Syracuse police officer was justified in the fatal shooting of Deric Brown last month when he opened fire on the officer. County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick said officer Joseph Mauro III was performing a routine traffic stop on Walnut Avenue near Madison Street.

FOCUS Greater Syracuse

As Onondaga Lake visitors get to enjoy expanded amenities such as the West Lake Trail, County officials have previously indicated a beach could possibly be added someday.  A new survey released today asks Central New York Residents what they envision for the lake including recreational activities.  FOCUS Greater Syracuse is offering the online survey on their website.  Spokesperson Dee Klees says this is different from the other lake surveys they’ve conducted in the past.

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