Science

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For those who diligently follow the world of science and it's rich history you are probably familiar with Madame Curie. And it just so happens,she's the focus of this week's Science on the radio with Dr. Marvin Druger.

To get more Science on the Radio you can subscribe in Apple Podcasts for automatic delivery of new episodes.

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Young women worked in teams today to create robots out of cardboard and bridges out of paper.  It’s all part of an effort by Liverpool High School Senior Rebecca Dromms to get girls interested in STEM careers.  She partnered with the SRC in North Syracuse to pursue her Girl Scout Gold Award with an event to show young women what they could do in the field.

Through one avenue or another we are all probably familiar with The Nobel Prize. But how much do we actually know about the history of the award? This week on Science on the Radio Dr. Marvin Druger gets us up to speed on the award that dates back to 1895.

Who is eligible to win the Nobel Prize? What does one actually win when they are  awarded the prize? Find the answers to these questions and more on this weeks episode of Science On The Radio.

If you like what you hear don't forget to subscribe in Apple Podcasts for automatic delivery of new episodes.

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There’s no question the world of Science suffered a great loss with the passing of physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking.  But experts on people with disabilities say his life was also important in other ways. 

Many people can envision pictures of Stephen Hawking, using a wheelchair and talking through a computer device due to his amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also called Lou Gehrig’s Disease. 

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SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry biology students are researching this year’s most compelling breakthroughs in evolutionary research, such as: fossil finds, species endangerment, and chemical resistance. Environmental forest and biology professor Rebecca Rundell says that almost 200 students have made posters revolving around Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution.

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This week on Science on the Radio we visit Green Lakes State Park located in the Town of Manlius. As most CNY natives will attest, the park is strikingly scenic, and has an impressive golf course designed by Robert Trent Jones.

The park is also home to perhaps the most studied meromictic lake—one in which layers of water do not mix—in the world. You'll hear more about this wonderful state park, this week on Science on the Radio with Dr Marvin Druger.

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These days you can get a brand new computer shipped directly to your house in a just a matter of days. The very first computer on the other hand, took 3 years to be built.

This week on Science on the Radio, Dr. Marvin Druger discusses the first electronic computer otherwise known as ENIAC.

You can hear Science on the Radio Wednesday nights at 8:35 on WAER.

This week on Science on the Radio Dr. Marvin Druger is talking Thermodynamics and specifically Entropy. Entropy is a measure of the degree of disorder in any isolated system, high Entropy means greater disorder.

Hear Science on the Radio with Dr. Marvin Druger Wednesday evenings at 8:35 on WAER.

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Lobsters comprise a family of large marine crustaceans.

Lobsters have long bodies with muscular tails, and live in crevices or burrows on the sea floor. Three of their five pairs of legs have claws, including the first pair, which are usually much larger than the others. Highly prized as seafood, lobsters are economically important, and are often one of the most profitable commodities in coastal areas they populate

Find out even more about our little friend the Lobster this week with Dr. Marvin Druger on Science on the Radio.

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Everyone should remember the solar eclipse that occurred this past August and captivated the country. This week on Science on The Radio we'll take a trip down memory lane and revisit some of the science that resulted in the phenomenon that was front and center this past Summer.

When is it safe to stare directly at the eclipse? And when is the next total solar eclipse going to occur in North America? Find out this week on Science on The Radio.

You can hear Science on The Radio every Wednesday Night at 8:35 on WAER. 

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