U.S. Supreme Court

Scott Willis / WAER News

The president of the group CNY Pride says the supreme court’s ruling supporting same sex marriage is probably the most the LGBT community can hope for within the realm of marriage and the rights that come with it.  Dr. Bruce Carter is also an Assistant Professor in the Psychology and Child and Family Studies Departments at Syracuse University's Falk College.  

  He says the decision is consistent with similar cases recognizing the rights of individuals.  He cites Justice Anthony Kennedy’s reasoning in the  decision…

Scott Willis / WAER News

  The effort to take large amounts of anonymous campaign donations out of political campaigns came to Syracuse City Hall Monday where common councilors approved a resolution supporting a constitutional amendment to overturn the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 "Citizens United" ruling.  

Councilor Jean Kessner voted yes because she supports the sentiment.  But she feels a constitutional amendment is a very slow path to get the results they want.

Scott Willis / WAER News

The head of an LGBT support group says a Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage would be very meaningful for the older LGBT population they serve.  Supreme Court justices heard oral arguments Tuesday on two issues regarding same-sex marriages.    Executive Director of Sage Upstate Kim Dill  says older couples have waited for this their entire lives. 

people with large signs saying corporations are not people, money is not speech
Move to Amend

Rallies are being held in Syracuse and across the country today in reaction to the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down overall limits on political contributions.  The 5 to 4 ruling in McCutcheon vs. FEC allows a single donor to give up to $3.5 million per election cycle to a political party.  The court’s majority said the previous $123,200 cap violated the First Amendment.  

Scott Willis / WAER News

Central New Yorkers opposed to the U-S Supreme Court’s Citizens United Decision marked the 4th anniversary of the ruling Tuesday by vowing to overturn it.  Supporters of the group Move to Amend want a constitutional amendment that would reverse what they say is corporations growing financial and corrupting influence on elections.   Group co-chair Michael Messina-Yauchzy  says we need to remember the first words of the constitution.